The Apostle’s Creed

Bishop Paul Barker is visiting BAC soon… and traditionally young people have prepared to meet the Bishop in confirmation class where they memorise and learn to explain three key Christian documents; the Ten Commandments, the Apostle’s Creed and the Lord’s Prayer. We thought it would be good for all of us to have a refresh – continuing this week with the Apostle’s Creed.

What is a Creed?
A creed is a statement of faith. The word ‘creed’ comes from the Latin credo, which means ‘I believe’. Creeds are meant to declare and safeguard God’s truth that is revealed in the Bible about himself, us, and creation.

Why is the Apostles’ Creed important?
The Apostles’ Creed states the essential beliefs of the Christian faith in a simple and concise way. It summarises what the Bible teaches about who God is and what he has done for us in Jesus Christ. It has become the declaration of faith that is used at our baptisms.

What does the Creed mean when we call Jesus ‘Lord’?
When we call Jesus Lord we acknowledge his authority as King of the world, the church, society and over every aspect of our lives. In calling Jesus Lord we submit our whole lives to him and seek to live every part of our lives for his praise, glory and honour.

Why does the Creed say that Jesus died and rose again?
These are two of the most important events in history! Jesus died a real, bodily death because of our sin. He really was dead from the first till third day, not simply resuscitated after a few hours. And Jesus was restored completely from death to life, never to die again.

Why does the Creed call the Church ‘catholic’? (I thought we were Anglican!)
Although the word ‘catholic’ is often recognised with the Roman Catholic Church, this is not where the word originally belongs. The word ‘catholic’ means universal. So the church is catholic because all churches are universally connected as a body of believers. So an Anglican Church is ‘catholic’, because it is part of the universal church of Jesus Christ.

Ben Soderlund – Assistant Minister

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The Ten Commandments

Bishop Paul Barker is visiting BAC soon… and traditionally young people have prepared to meet the Bishop in confirmation class where they memorise and learn to explain three key Christian documents; the Ten Commandments, the Apostle’s Creed and the Lord’s Prayer. We thought it would be good for all of us to have a refresh – starting this week with the Ten Commandments.

What do we learn in the 10 Commandments? (NIV Exodus 20 & Deuteronomy 5)

After saving his people Israel from slavery in Egypt, God gave them the Ten Commandments as covenant obligations to live by. They reveal God’s character and outline our duty towards God and towards our neighbours.

What is our duty towards God? Commandments 1 to 4

We are to believe in him, to respect and love him, with all our heart, with all our mind, with all our soul, and with all our strength; to worship him alone, to give him thanks, to put our whole trust in him, to call upon him, to honour his holy Name and his Word, and to serve him truly all the days of our lives.

What is our duty towards our neighbour? Commandments 5 to 10

We are to love them as ourselves, and to do unto others what we would wish they would do to us; we are to honour my parents and others in positions of responsibility, show respect and courtesy to all; to hurt no one by word or deed; to bear no ill-will nor hatred in our hearts; to keep our body pure, and be true and fair in all we say and do; and not to desire things that belong to others, but to work honestly, and do our duty as God guides us.

Is it humanly possible to keep all the Commandments?

No! We fail to fulfill them perfectly however hard we try. But one purpose of God’s Law is to show us our utter inability to obey God perfectly, and so to point to our need for Christ’s atoning death on our behalf.

Ben Soderlund – Assistant Minister

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Who is Berwick Anglican Church?

BAC is a network of four Christian congregations meeting at 55 Peel Street Berwick. Three of them are large enough to be their own parishes. Together we are a changing church and a growing church. We endeavour to stay faithful to the gospel of Jesus Christ and the Bible as the Word of God. Growth always brings change and it is helpful to reflect on how BAC is changing.

In 2011 and 2016 BAC participated in the National Church Life Survey. On one particular Sunday that year we took the time in every service to ask every adult in the service to fill out a survey.

Some interesting results from the NCLS report about those who did the survey at BAC:

  • 51% were born overseas
  • 20% speak a language other than English at home
  • 38% of us are new attendees in the last 5 years
  • 3% of those surveyed identified as ‘visitors’, 8% as ‘newcomers’. So about 1 in 10 people on a Sunday are those new or looking for a church.
  • 91% said they felt a strong sense of belonging to BAC
  • 76% of attenders said they always/usually experience inspiration during services

If you would like to see the NCLS report, I will send out a link to those on the weekly BAC newsletter email list. You can subscribe via leaving your email address in the “Communication Cards” in the pews. I praise God for every person he has sent and is sending into our church network!

Your Pastor,
Wayne

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Sermons On Line at BAC

The Church has been publishing Sunday Sermons on the Internet since January 2002, most of which are still available on this web site. The web site has now been updated to allow Sermons to be accessed from mobile phones and tablet.
1 – To access the latest Sermon click on the link on the left of the screen
2 – When the new page opens click on the speaker icon to start listening
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Praying Against Fear

The Apostle Paul has to be of the bravest man in all Scripture. He encountered physical torture for the gospel, false imprisonment, and even attacks for wild animals! (See Acts 28:3 and 1 Corinthians 15:32).

Paul boldly shared the gospel with working class people and the educated elite. He debated philosophers in Athens. He also shared the gospel with governors and people in high authority.

In all this Paul asked for prayer to share the gospel fearlessly.

Pray also for me, that whenever I speak, words may be given me so that I will fearlessly make known the mystery of the gospel, for which I am an ambassador in chains. Pray that I may declare it fearlessly, as I should. (NIV Ephesians 6:19-20)

If the Apostle Paul needed prayer for courage, then so do we. Do not be surprised when you feel scared to talk about Jesus with our friends. Ask God for mercy on times you have given in to the fear. And then pray for future courage and fearlessness in standing up for Jesus. Ask and you will receive!

Your Pastor,
Wayne

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